Frankie Mancini / Gavel Media

The Curse of American Horror Story

“Remember when Glee was good?” is a phrase I’ve heard too many times, referencing Ryan Murphy’s sensational project that shone brightly in its first three seasons (and arguably fourth), before its characters, plot, and viewership began to fade away into a type of oblivion.

Now, a similar tragedy has struck. A tragedy that warrants the comment, “Remember when American Horror Story was good?” when speaking about Murphy’s completely different but just as successful horror anthology series.

As a disclaimer, I cannot denounce the most recent seasons as outright bad. Instead, I will say two things. 

First, many of my friends (and myself), who would once label themselves as passionate fans, have not seen some of the most recent seasons. If they did, they did not make it to the last episode. If asked to list them, answers may include the one with the clown, or Lady Gaga, or Sarah Paulson’s phobia of holes. I thought I was finally going to make it through Apocalypse but, unfortunately, the hold was not strong enough.

Second, think about Asylum, now Murder House, now the most iconic season of television ever known to humankind, Coven. Now think about the rest. In my opinion, nothing can truly compare. Sure, major media outlets covered each season and each episode, and there are certainly impressive scenes, acting performances, and commentaries throughout. But did any ever inspire anything to the quality of this vine or this gif?—both from Coven, might I add.

Now onto the news that sparked my intense contemplation of this television series (sorry it took this long). Sarah Paulson will not play a major role in the upcoming ninth season 1984, set to premiere on Sept. 18. Same goes for Evan Peters, another backbone member of the show.

Luckily, fewer tears can be shed than were shed for the departure of American Horror Story superstar Jessica Lange; it is reported that Paulson and Peters will return for the tenth season of the show, which has already been confirmed.

Even more luckily, fan favorites Emma Roberts and Billie Lourd, among others, are confirmed to return. Fans of Pose, another one of Ryan Murphy’s revered creations, will be happy to see the show’s star, Angelica Ross, make an appearance.

And to bring it all to full circle, fans of Glee may be eager to see how their favorite (and probably only) television Glee club director Matthew Morrison will fare in this world of horror. If Lea Michele’s performance in Murphy’s Scream Queens is any indication, I think we’re in for a promising spectacle. Maybe not as good as it once was, but what is?

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