Ellen Gerst / Gavel Media

Landry, Yiadom, and Moore Look to Excel in NFL

Boston College sent three players to the NFL in the 2018 draft. BC’s highest drafted player, star defensive-end, Harold Landry,was taken 41st overall by the Tennessee Titans, becoming BC’s highest drafted player since the Carolina Panthers took Luke Kuechly in 2012.

Landry leaves BC with his name imprinted in the Eagles’ record books. He holds BC’s record for single season sacks (16), while also leaving with the second-most career sacks and tackles for loss. Yet, a year removed from his stellar junior season, which had most NFL scouts projecting him being drafted in the top 10, Landry’s senior year was hampered by an ankle injury, causing him to play only eight games in 2017 before having to end his season.

Going into the offseason, most experts didn’t expect Landry's  injury to have much of an effect on his draft stock. Unfortunately, during the NFL combine, many teams had Landry medically flagged for back and knee issues, enough concern to let a top-10 talent slide into the second round.

For the Titans, Landry could end up being the steal of the draft. If he is able to stay healthy and live up to his potential as a dominant pass rusher, then the Titans just added a premiere defensive talent.

His ability as one of the draft's elite pass rushers should translate well to the next level," said Head Coach Steve Addazio. "He has positioned himself to be a major factor right away with the Titans.”

Two other BC defensive playmakers, Isaac Yiadom and Kamrin Moore, were taken in the draft. The defensive backs were taken in the third and sixth rounds respectively.

Yiadom joins a stout Denver Broncos defense looking to redefine itself against the pass after recently getting rid of All-Pro cornerback Aqib Talib. With the Broncos' holes in the secondary, Yiadom finds himself in the perfect situation to contribute the first week of the season.

Yiadom isn’t a natural ball-hawk, recording three interceptions in his career. His athleticism and intelligence, however, had scouts excited about his potential. Not only can Yiadom make a difference on defense, but he can also make an immediate impact on special teams. Since his freshman year, Yiadom has been consistent and versatile on a stout special team unit.

Yiadom has a lot to learn and adjust to in the NFL, but the real value in him will likely come two or three seasons down the line, where he has the potential to develop into a full-fledged starter.

Moore, the other DB drafted, joins an increasingly crowded secondary with the New Orleans Saints. The Saints used back-to-back picks on defensive backs, picking Wisconsin DB Natrell Jamerson in the round before Moore.

Due to the sheer amount of players in the Saints' secondary, it's reasonable to expect that Moore won’t get much playing time this season. After the Saints' injury issues last season, Moore seems to be more of an insurance pick in case injuries plague the Saints again.

However, much like Yiadom, Moore has the potential to contribute right away on special teams, after playing special teams for BC all four years. Moore was also selected as team captain by his teammates prior to the 2017 season. 

Moore went slightly higher than most predicted. His injury history, limited athleticism, and under-developed ball skills had most projecting Moore to be a top-priority undrafted free agent. Should Moore stay healthy, he should be able to find himself a consistent contributor on the Saints’ special team.

Overall, three players drafted from BC has become pretty standard. Since Addazio took over, BC has only had more than three players selected once, when four were drafted in 2014. 2019, however, has potential to be a standout year for BC draftees as a strong senior class returns on both sides of the ball.

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