The Gavel Endorses Thomas Napoli and Olivia Hussey for UGBC President, Vice-President

The Gavel editorial board has chosen to endorse Thomas Napoli, A&S '16, and Olivia Hussey, A&S '17, for UGBC president and vice-president for their unwavering commitment to on-campus progressive reform and their enduring desire to, as Napoli stressed, "give the students a seat at the [administrative] table."

All candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency exhibit progressivism and envision our University a better one than it was just a year ago, but Napoli and Hussey seem to be the duo most prepared to take on this endeavor.

Their platform is pragmatic and tempered by the reality of the length of their potential tenure; their beliefs rest on a sound series of action plans that appeal to some of the Boston College community's most pressing issues.

Specifically, Napoli and Hussey propose a "free-speech and expression policy" that would provide designated space on campus for organizations to express their opinion and worldview -- an initiative that is sure to bring lively reform to the Quad and other student hubs that look to foster the expression of speech and idea.

Napoli is a taskmaster. He met with the newly-appointed Dean of Students Thomas Mogan before he kickstarted his run for UGBC president, expressing his concern for the lack of free speech and expression on campus. Mogan, Napoli says, is ready and willing to work with the student body and UGBC to see through changes on physical space in areas where free speech is impactful -- O'Neill Plaza, the Quad and more.

Hussey's background is far from sophomoric. She co-led several mental health projects like "Be Conscious" with Cassidy Gallegos, LSOE '16, who is also running for UGBC president with vice-presidential candidate Michael Keefe, A&S '16.

Hussey helped to bring the "What I Be Project" to BC, and is making mental health a cornerstone of her reign of the platform. Her impressive understanding of what it takes to create a successful mental health initiative is evidenced by her platform proposals, which involve integrating mental health training into RA and OL training, and starting a "Mental Health Week" on campus. Both candidates rounded out their thoughts on campus-wide reforms by addressing an understaffed and underperforming University Counseling Services office. There is no doubt that the duo is attuned to the student body's needs.

Although Napoli and Hussey come from different poles of on-campus reform, they possess a cohesiveness and energy that is unmatched among the other candidates. Their branding and messaging from a campaign standpoint was superior.

We believe they are up to the task of tackling the problems of a student government that is too often idle in its concrete action and, frankly, untrustworthy. And, if a good campaign is any indication of a good administration, the BC student body should be in confident hands.