Expecting the Unexpected: Surprise Albums

If you’re reading this, it’s really too late.

Drake’s newest mixtape/album/whatever-it-is suddenly dropped last night after he teased a video named “Jungle” earlier in the day. The 17-track effort, titled If You’re Reading This It's Too Late, is no small feat. Although a few of the songs have been released prior to the drop, it’s still a ton to handle for fans and haters alike.

Photo courtesy of Tumblr

Flashbacks of Beyonce flood the mind, which dropped unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on how you look at it) during the 2013 exam season. Let us be thankful that Drake’s release at least kept the student body in mind.

With surprise albums becoming all the more popular (D’Angelo also comes to mind), students need the proper tools to handle these shocks. Whether its Queen B or Drizzy, here is a step-by-step guide on how to deal with surprise albums.

  1. Verify that it’s actually happening. Nothing is worse than believing an artist has released new music when they haven’t. You post a link to Facebook with “OMGGG!!!!!!!!” as the caption until your friend informs you that the news is wrong, and you look like a fool.

Photo courtesy of Tumblr

  1. If it’s actually happening, accept it. Yeah, it is hard to believe. But as Beyonce and Drake have proved, it’s very possible. So don’t be in denial of the truth.

Gif courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Don’t get upset. If You’re Reading This It's Too Late as an album title really gets at the feeling of surprise albums. You feel like you’re behind on the news, and you wish that you knew before your friend texted you “DUDE DRIZZY JUST DROPPED A NEW ALBUM WAT?!?!?!?!” Without fail, you will feel like you’re late to the party. Don’t get mad though; just move on.

Gif courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Feel free to post to Facebook. It’s Drake, your favorite artist, and he just put 17 new songs on iTunes for you. Yes, just for you! No one is going to judge you for expressing your somewhat-embarrassing love for a musician. So type away.
Photo courtesy of Maria Elena / Flickr

Photo courtesy of Maria Elena / Flickr

  1. Text your friends. If a large chain of all-caps messages hasn’t already ensued between you and your friends, you’re doing it wrong. Exclamation points, emojis and spelling errors are all allowed, if not encouraged.

Photo courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Listen to the music. Drop what you’re doing and at least play one or two of the new songs. Put away those orgo notes; stop typing that 10-page paper (even if you’re still on page two). Engage in this moment; it’s only going to happen once. When you’re 67 years old and enjoying a margarita while sitting on the beach, you get to say that you remember listening to this new music alongside millions of others all over the world. It’s a big deal.

Gif courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Know when to stop listening. Sad as it may be, we are students with real academic responsibilities. True, Beyonce knows how to make studying for finals extremely difficult. But you have to find a way to balance the surprise albums with the work that must be accomplished. Plan out a schedule that puts work first, but also incorporates study breaks so you can bump some of that new Drizzy.

Photo courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Develop an opinion on the album. You’re hyped up because Queen B shocked the world with a self-titled album, but don’t let that hinder your ability to form a legitimate judgment of the music. When you talk to your friends after the first strain of excited texts, you want to be able to share your thoughts on the strengths and weaknesses of the music.

Gif courtesy of Tumblr

  1. If you hate the musician, do your best to avoid your friends, radios, iTunes, the Internet… In fact, maybe you should just stay inside your room and sit in the dark for a few days. Sorry.

Photo courtesy of Tumblr

  1. Be aware. Given the recent trend, musicians will probably continue to surprise us with unannounced albums. Even if it doesn’t happen often, don’t expect these sudden music releases to go away anytime soon. Always refer back to this guide to avoid the panic that may ensue during unexpected music drops.

Gif courtesy of Tumblr

Comments

Jonathan Reed