Fall from Window Results in MIT Frat Suspension

Lambda Chi Alpha at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has been suspended after a woman fell from a third-story window at their fraternity house party on August 31.

The suspension terms include not meeting, hosting or participating in activities until the investigation of the case is complete. In addition, Boston officials hope to arrange a meeting with the university’s administrators to evaluate the fraternities and determine a “proper use” for the various houses.

The woman, who is a student but does not attend MIT, was taken to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center after the fall. It has not been revealed how she fell

Gavel Media/Tori Fisher

Gavel Media/Tori Fisher

nor what injuries she sustained.

The matter is being investigated by both MIT officials and the City of Boston’s Inspectional Services Department. The latter found no violations after inspecting the premises last Tuesday. However, there will be an investigation into whether the location was overcrowded, as the house does not have a permit and is thus prohibited from hosting gatherings of 50 people or more.

An Emmanuel College freshman named Brooke Ames attended the party, claiming she witnessed the woman dancing, then leaning back and tumbling out the open window. The woman landed on the one-story garage below the window. Ames said that no one had been drinking, as the gathering was “supposed to be a dry party” and that approximately 100 people were at the house that night.

Greek life in the area, which is absent at Boston College, has encountered other problems in the past year due to over-capacity and alcohol involvement. Last September, an MIT student fell from a fourth-story skylight at the university’s Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. The incident led to a ban on large gatherings at fraternities, sororities and other independent housing groups at the school. This January, Boston officials began to allow these groups to apply for new “assembly use” permits in order to resume hosting large gatherings.

At the time of the party, no “assembly use” permit requests had been submitted by any of the MIT organizations.

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