Climate Change: The Next Weapon of Mass Destruction?

President Obama last Friday announced his proposal of $1-billion in new funding to help prepare for the effects of climate change in drought-ravaged Fresno, California, responding to complaints that he has not addressed to issue as promised in his campaign platform.

Secretary of State John Kerry also issued an international plea for more action on the issue of climate change.

Photo courtesy of Talk Radio News Service/Flickr

Photo courtesy of Talk Radio News Service/Flickr

Kerry addressed a group of students and government officials in Jakarta, Indonesia, where he remarked that the country is “on the front lines of climate change,” and urged the leaders to do more cut down greenhouse-gas emissions.

According to Kerry, scientists predict that changes in ocean temperature and acidification could put half of Jakarta underwater and risk the lives of millions of people. The effect could also reduce fish harvesting by up to 40%. Thus, Indonesia, one of the top ten countries responsible for global carbon emission, has a lot to lose from climate change.

Kerry called on concerned younger citizens in particular to speak out and make public officials unable to ignore the issue of climate change.

Photo courtesy of Ras67/Wikimedia Commons

Photo courtesy of Ras67/Wikimedia Commons

Calling climate change “perhaps the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction,” Kerry instructed all U.S. embassies to prioritize the issue of climate change.

Before arriving in Indonesia, Kerry had made a successful agreement with China to “pursue a cleaner path forward together.” China and the U.S. are the two biggest carbon-emitting countries globally. They traditionally have had opposing opinions on the issue of climate change.

Despite the good efforts that the Obama administration has made in helping prepare for the effects of climate change, there are some dubious voices who continue to spark the debate on the domestic scene.

Photo courtesy of EEA/Wikimedia Commons

Photo courtesy of EEA/Wikimedia Commons

“I think the big debate is how much of it is man-made and how much of it will just naturally happen as earth evolves,” Republican Governor Pat McCrory said to ABC News.

The vice chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, also said on NBC’s Meet the Press that the driving forces of climate change are still not fully understood.

“What we have to look at is the fact that you don’t make good laws, sustainable laws, when you’re making them on hypotheses, or theories, or unproven sciences,” she said.

On the supportive side, a report issued by the UN climate panel suggests those scientists are 95% certain of the human impact on climate change since the mid twentieth century. Without a united effort to reduce carbon dioxide emission, they maintain, the drivers of emissions growth will continue in the future for certain.

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