Are Millennials Lazy? Employers Think So

Starting a career can be very difficult and stressful for graduating seniors. The job market seems to be shrinking. Now, employers are beginning to think young applicants are lazy and underprepared.

As anyone who has ever ridden mass transit knows, commuting is a lot of fun. Photo courtesy of Travis Ruse/Wikimedia Commons

As anyone who has ever ridden mass transit knows, commuting is a lot of fun.
Photo courtesy of Travis Ruse/Wikimedia Commons

Many businesspeople, hiring managers and corporate recruiters find that young people are neither adequately prepared nor do they have a firm understanding of the workplace. Furthermore, several analyses, including one by Time magazine, suggest that members of Generation Y—or millennials—lack science and math skills and soft skills, such as the ability to function effectively in the workplace.

“A survey by the Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College found that more than 60 percent of employers said applicants lack ‘communication and interpersonal skills,’” reports CNBC. “Many managers also said that today's applicants can't think critically and creatively, solve problems or write well.”

An employer imagines himself working with a new hire. Photo courtesy of Getty Images.

An employer imagines himself working with a new hire.
Photo courtesy of Getty Images.

With statistics like these, it is no wonder that millennials are nervous about applying for jobs. However, many have reacted strongly to such claims that millennials are lazy or narcissistic.

In fact, millennials lead the nation in volunteerism according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Young voters also turn out in record numbers. “Voters mirrored the voting public's makeup of four years ago, when Obama shattered minority voting barriers and drove young voters to the polls unlike any candidate in generations,” reported the Associated Press.

IVN reports “millennials are tech savy, collaborative, and entrepreneurial.  In fact, 46 percent of millennials want to start their own business within 5 years.”

Furthermore, studies are calling into question the statement that members of Generation Y are characteristically narcissistic. So, with this information in hand, what can millennials do?

Photo courtesy of Peter Bennets/Wikimedia Commons

Photo courtesy of Peter Bennets/Wikimedia Commons

Employers are looking for students who are skilled, educated and have an understanding of the work environment. Many millennials may have a skewed perception of what the office environment should be, which can inhibit the initial growth progress.

Forbes has suggested that the younger generation start careers early, remain patient and learn from criticism. Millennials, they maintain, will be able to adapt to the work environment as needed. A good foundation would be to gain experience in internships and part time employment.

As college students, it is beneficial to take advantage of the career centers and the advice given by college recruiters. Having such exposure and basic experience could potentially boost an applicant’s appeal and help demonstrate that millennials are not as lazy as one might think.

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