Capital Views: Overheard on the city streets

This is my last blog of the summer. As my internship comes to a close, you will no longer be subjected to ramblings from the stumbling intern. I’m just glad I have all my limbs intact to tell the tale.

photoI’ve tried to learn from my summer as an intern. I have attempted to squeeze every ounce of knowledge I can out of my experience. Some days have had more meaning than others. But what has most stood out to me in these last 12 weeks is just this: experience is experience. Whether it’s your dream internship or your barista shift at the local coffee shop, you learn what makes you happy and what makes you unhappy – and perhaps inch closer to what will make you happy all the time. If you don’t figure it out right away, you will eventually.  At least I hope so.

I also learned that the people you work with make all the difference. I was lucky enough to have bosses and colleagues who not only believed in me but in my work. I was able to make my internship what I wanted it to be and better the organization while doing so. And, I have made some awesome intern friends, who know what it’s like to walk past the death bricks.

This intern summer of schlepping along the mean (not so mean, really) streets of D.C.  also helped me to learn one simple fact about myself: I am a city girl. Always have been, always will be. I’ve lived in many different cities (New York, Boston, Paris, Washington) in my almost 20 years, so I suppose I’ve been conditioned from a very young age to love the hustle, the bustle, the movement and the life. I can’t stay away. It’s exciting. The tall buildings. Those air vents with holes – it’s taken a while but I know it’s okay to walk over them, now. I have already moaned about how much I miss the T and the city of Boston. But up until now, the mean city streets of Washington D.C. have done me very well.

The things you hear on the city streets are sobering, inspiring, enlightening and sometimes, simply put: stupid. I hope the following gives you a taste of the oodles of entertainment I enjoy on a daily basis.

"Hellooo, do you have a minute for gay rights?" – bright-eyed college aged student with a clipboard.

"Well actually no, if you would just do it better, you're just like all the other 23 year olds" – middle-aged woman in black on the phone.

"But ya know, Congress wants to regulate this now" – large man in a suit on a street corner.

IMG_2785"Hellooo, do you have a moment for human rights?" – bright-eyed college aged student with a clipboard.

"Yea, I usually drink iced coffee but I can also drink hot coffee." – young woman baring her midriff..

"With a smartphone, you'd think you can keep all those stupid questions to yourself" – mother to a child.

"No pole dancing, ladies" – tourist mother to what appeared to be a troupe of young girls.

"It's really unfortunate, we should have gone to Colorado" – 30-something woman in a suit.

"I can't believe that parking" - elderly man to his wife.

"It's not a ticket" -cop who hands out a flyer of some sort to a stranger.

"Phones don't work in this thing" -tourists on the metro.

"Let me tell you that it is ridiculous hard to do" -woman on the phone in all black.

"They were sending like the most nastiest texts" - tall guy with a nasally voice.

"It's weird sharing a bed room ya kno? Sometimes I wake up and I think, he took my pillow!" - working woman in a blazer and sneakers.

This world takes all kinds, doesn’t it?

I hope this convinces you to watch what you say because you never know who will be listening and perhaps, blogging. And, I hope it convinces you to spend as much time in any kind of city — because who knows what you'll run into.  As for me, I’ll be turning in my death bricks soon enough for some cobblestones. I'll be headed back to Boston, the other city I love, where I’ll continue to figure out where I fit in this big wide working world, one trip/spill/tumble at a time.

Photos by Katie Levingston/Gavel Media. 

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