Where’s Baldwin? Ireland – Cliffs of Moher and Dublin

No, Baldwin did not actually fall off the Cliffs of Moher, but it could’ve happened more easily than you might think.  Walking along the edge of the Cliffs of Moher, (located on the Western coast of Ireland, about two hours from downtown Galway), there isn’t much protecting the more adventurous tourists from a few-hundred foot fall into the waves below.  Nor is it very reassuring to find out, right as you’re about to walk out on the cliffs, that they were closed the day before due to extremely high winds.

 

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

However, despite these incredible dangers (I’m afraid of heights), seeing the Cliffs of Moher was definitely a highlight of my trip to Ireland.  We woke up at 5:30 in the morning to take a two-and-a-half-hour bus ride from Dublin to Galway, and from there wove our way through the Irish countryside as we made our way to the cliffs.  The cliffs themselves were truly breathtaking, even on a misty day, and laying down on the rocks and sticking my head out over the edge gave me a feeling of part terror and part exhilaration that I will probably never forget.

 

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Dublin itself was a whirlwind of sightseeing – we strolled down Grafton Street, along the waterfront and across the Trinity campus, peeked into Christ Church and St. Patrick’s Cathedral, wandered around the outside of Dublin Castle (visitors weren’t allowed inside because Ireland currently holds the Presidency of the Council of the European Union, meaning that the castle was occupied by various diplomats), and took a tour of an old jail where political prisoners were held and executed after the 1916 Rebellion, also known as the Easter Rising.

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

However, the most “cultural” part of the sightseeing revolved around the pubs – we ate Irish stew and drank beer at the Brazen Head, the oldest pub in Ireland (circa the twelfth century), met some Irish lads in the super touristy but super fun Temple Bar, and ducked out of the rain into another crowded pub on our last afternoon to watch the end of the Ireland-England rugby game.  We ended the weekend with a tour of the Guinness factory – the beer itself was a little dark for me, but the view over the city from the Gravity Bar at the top of the factory was incredible.

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Courtesy of Jillian Timko

Check back soon to see where Baldwin’s next stop will be!

Halftime-Online-Ad-Final

Comments